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The Rev. Canon Sally Grover Bingham

The Rev. Canon Sally Grover Bingham

Keynote: Faith, Science, and Climate Action

The Reverend Canon Sally Grover Bingham, an Episcopal priest and Canon for the Environment in the Diocese of California, was one of the first faith leaders to fully recognize the changing climate as a moral issue. She is Founder and President Emeritus of The Regeneration Project and its Interfaith Power & Light campaign, which currently has 20,000 congregation members in forty states. Rev. Bingham serves on the national board of the Environmental Defense Fund, and the advisory board of both the Union of Concerned Scientists and Climate One. She has received many awards, including, in 2012, the Rachel Carson Women in Conservation Award from the Audubon Society and the Life Time Achievement Award from the Festival of Faiths and, in 2014, the Bishop of California Green Cross Award. Rev. Bingham is the lead author of Love God Heal Earth, a collection of 21 essays on environmental stewardship by religious leaders, published by St. Lynn’s Press.


Dr. Katharine Hayhoe

Dr. Katharine Hayhoe

Religion has Nothing to do with Climate Change, Right?

Katharine Hayhoe is an accomplished atmospheric scientist who studies climate change and why it matters to us here and now. She is also a remarkable communicator: in 2014, she was recognized by Time Magazine as one of the top 100 Most Influential People in the world and by Foreign Policy as one of the top 100 Global Thinkers; her work was featured on the Emmy award-winning documentary series, The Years of Living Dangerously; and she won the American Geophysical Union’s award for climate communication. In 2016, she was named to the POLITICO 50 list of thinkers, doers, and visionaries transforming American politics, while in 2017 she was named one of FORTUNE’s world’s greatest leaders.

She is a lead author for the U.S. National Climate Assessments and has served on the panels for the National Academy of Science, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and many other professional organizations devoted to understanding and communicating climate change. Katharine is currently a professor and directs the Climate Science Center at Texas Tech University. She has a B.Sc. in Physics from the University of Toronto and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science from the University of Illinois.


Dr. Bruce Maxwell

Dr. Bruce Maxwell

Serious Impacts are Projected for Montana’s Climate

Bruce Maxwell is Professor of Agroecology and Applied Plant Ecology in the Department of Land Resources and Environmental Science (LRES) and co-Director of the Montana Institute on Ecosystems at Montana State University. Maxwell was instrumental in the formation of the Department of LRES and has received national awards for outstanding teaching, best peer reviewed papers and outstanding graduate student from the Weed Science Society of America. He has published over 100 scientific journal articles and book chapters, chaired and been a member of numerous agricultural and ecological research grant review panels and been a member of two National Academy of Science National Research Council Committees on Agriculture. He was a Fulbright Fellow in Argentina in 2007. His research has historically straddled the disciplines of invasion biology and agroecology.


Dr. Libby Khumalo

Dr. Libby Khumalo

Landscape Health = Human Health

Libby manages the culture-driven conservation program at the Center for Large Landscape Conservation, with most of her work focused on building partnerships in the Blackfeet Nation and to bringing many different voices into regional conservation planning and adaptation. In partnership with Pikuni colleagues, she helped facilitate a first-ever Blackfeet Climate Change Adaptation Plan and the new Blackfeet Country & Climate Change website. She is currently partnering with the Blackfeet Fish and Wildlife Department, Blackfeet Community College, the Blackfeet Environmental Office, and Blackfeet Agriculture Resource Management Planning Team to increase natural water storage by protecting beavers and restoring riparian areas as (The Ksik Stakii Project). She is committed to mentoring young professionals through participation in the Big Sky Watershed AmeriCorps Program.

Libby has a PhD in Forestry from the University of Montana and a Master’s degree in Environmental Management from the University of Pretoria. For her dissertation, Libby assessed how community-based conservation in Namibia impacted people differently, looking specifically at the spread of conservation benefits (for example, conservation-based jobs) and costs (for example, crop damage by elephants) within a rural community. Her ethnographic research has equipped her to work with diverse groups of people on conservation efforts in Montana and abroad.


Drs. Lori and Rob Byron

Drs. Lori and Rob Byron

Landscape Health = Human Health

Lori Byron is a medical doctor with 27 years of experience as a pediatrician on the Crow Indian Reservation and a past hospital chaplain. A Master’s candidate in Energy Policy at John Hopkins University, Lori is the current climate advocate and co-chair of the Health Team for Citizens Climate Education, an international climate advocacy and education group. Lori is a past president of the Montana Academy of Pediatrics.

Rob Byron is an internal medicine physician who retired from the Indian Health Service and Veterans Affairs and currently serves as the CIO on the Bighorn Valley Health Clinic at St. Vincent’s Hospital. He is a committed climate advocate and serves as the co-chair of the Health Team for Citizens Climate Education. Rob is a past-governor of the Montana College of Physicians and past member of Montana’s Board of Environmental Review.

Rob and Lori Byron are Co-chairs of the Citizens Climate Health Team.


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Pastor John Lund

Creation Cries in Eager Longing: Motivating Congregations for Change

Rev. John Lund is an ELCA pastor who has served as the campus pastor and director for Emmaus Campus Ministry at the University of Montana in Missoula for the past 13 years. His formal education includes a BA in physics, MA in sociology, and an MDiv degree. Rev. Lund helps bring people together from the intersections of campus, faith, and community around pressing issues of the day. He has been on the founding leadership teams of the Missoula Interfaith Collaborative, SALAM (Standing Alongside America’s Muslims), Montana Faith and Climate Action, and the Missoula Anti-racism Coalition (still emerging). Lund is an avid outdoor enthusiast who can be found on the mountains, lakes, and rivers all seasons of the year.


Abby Huseth

Abby Huseth

Faith-Led Advocacy

Abby Huseth coordinates Faith and Climate Action Montana, a multi-faith coalition educating and facilitating conversation on the intersections between climate change and social and theological issues. She works with Climate Smart Missoula, a community-based organization working to engage citizens on local climate change issues. Abby has a M.S. in Environmental Studies from the University of Montana and a B.A. in religion from St. Olaf College.


Will Wright

Will Wright

Solar Infrastructure in/on Faith Buildings & Properties

Will is a parishioner at Resurrection University Catholic Church in Bozeman and organizer of its Creation Care ministry. He is also a doctoral student in environmental history at Montana State University working on a dissertation about large landscape conservation. Will brings experience in working in national parks, faith-based green groups, and public education, as well as showing the connections between social and environmental issues. He lives in Belgrade with his wife Carly and their happy feral boy.


Jean Collins

The Rev. Jean Collins

Solar Infrastructure in/on Faith Buildings & Properties

The Rev. Jean Collins serves St. James’ Episcopal Church in Lewistown, Montana. She has been the Rector there since September of 2013. Previously she served the Episcopal Churches in Ravalli County. St. James installed solar panels in October of 2017. The solar panels were our next step in stewardship of our environment. In 2012, St. James initiated plastics recycling in Fergus County. The congregation has worked in environmental education and endeavored to make its beautiful old buildings more energy efficient in recent years.


Eric Huseth

Pastor Eric Huseth

Solar Infrastructure in/on Faith Buildings & Properties

Eric grew up in Plymouth, Minnesota and attended St. Olaf College. During college, he sang in the St. Olaf Choir and was active in the Student Congregation on campus. He also enjoyed being a counselor at Luther Heights Bible Camp in Ketchum, Idaho for two summers. After graduation he traveled to England through the ELCA’s Young Adults in Global Mission Program, spending a year volunteering in a Church of England parish located in inner city London. Upon returning to the United States, Eric enrolled at Luther Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota where he completed two academic years. He then transferred (following his future wife, Abby, whom he met in the St. Olaf Choir!) to Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary in Berkeley, California where he graduated from in 2013. His internship was at St. Mark’s Lutheran Church and the San Francisco Interfaith Council located in San Francisco. Eric has a passion for young adult ministry as well as interfaith dialog and cooperation: all of which inform his identity as a Lutheran.


Mary Stein

Mary Stein

Food Security and Environmental/ Social Justice

Mary Stein is the Program Leader of the Sustainable Food and Bioenergy Systems (SFBS) undergraduate degree program at Montana State University. Mary has over 25 years of experience working in in the fields of human nutrition and food systems, in Montana and across the United States. She was part of the team that launched the SFBS program in 2009. In 2011, Mary seized the opportunity to work nationally for a few years, serving as the Deputy Director of the National Farm to School Network. She returned to MSU and the SFBS Program in the summer of 2016 where she is teaching, advising, and providing coordinated leadership for this interdisciplinary program. Mary has a B.S. in Biology from Tufts University and a M.S. in Human Nutrition Science Colorado State University. When not in her office at MSU, you can find Mary harvesting the never-ending supply of zucchini from her garden and exploring the beautiful outdoors with her family, friends, and the world’s most perfect dog.


Jill Mackin

Jill Mackin

Food Security and Environmental/Social Justice

Jill Falcon Mackin is an Anishinaabe woman, bear clan member, and scholar of indigenous food systems. She is in the process of writing her doctoral dissertation on Ojibwe food systems, historical impacts on native sovereignty over food systems, and the survivance of traditional foodways at Montana State University. Through the Native Land Project, she works in partnership work with the Amskapi Piikani (Blackfeet) who are actively involved in re-establishing sovereignty over their food system and management of their own lands. Jill is a member of the Midewiwin (Way of the Heart) Society, Minweyweywingaan (Good Sounding) Lodge, in Roseau River, Manitoba. With her partner and their children, she lives in Bozeman, in the Valley of the Flowers.


Paul Lachapelle

Paul Lachapelle

A Facilitated Strategy for Action

Paul Lachapelle is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at Montana State University-Bozeman and serves as the Extension Community Development Specialist. Paul earned his Ph.D. at the University of Montana’s College of Forestry and Conservation in 2006 with a focus on natural resource policy and governance. He has conducted research and taught in both Montana and internationally with applied research, development work, and language training in Nepal as a U.S. Fulbright Scholar. Other research and training includes work with Inuit in several arctic national parks with Parks Canada in the Canadian Territory of Nunavut, review and consultation of forest management and community development projects in Guinea, West Africa through the U.S. Forest Service International Programs.


The Rev. Valerie Webster

The Rev. Valerie Webster

Welcome Dinner Opening Prayer

The Rev. Valerie Webster, Ecumenical and Inter-religious Officer of the Diocese of Montana, facilitates Ecumenical and inter-religious ministry through education, advocacy, and community building at multiple levels. An Associate Priest at All Saints in Big Sky, a shared ministry of the Episcopal and ELCA Lutheran churches, she is a part of a diverse worshipping community and facilitates group studies and retreats. On the state level, as a part of the leadership team of MAC, the Montana Association of Christians, she advocates for “the least of these” — Montana’s needy children, elderly, and differently-abled, who are most severely impacted by climate change. Nationally (the National Workshop on Christian Unity) and globally (the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women), she works across faith-based and non-governmental organizations to integrate spiritual insights and inspirations to address community needs from Creation Care to Policies & Programs impacting those on the margins.


Anne Carlson

Dr. Anne Carlson

Faith-Led Advocacy

Anne works on climate change related issues in the Northern Rockies through a combination of collaborative, landscape-level adaptation projects and an intensive regional outreach campaign on the impacts of climate change — what it means for Montanans in their everyday lives — and the role of large landscape conservation and restoration in supporting ecosystem resilience. Both programs seek to identify the destructive impacts of climate change in the Northern Rockies and focus additional scientific analysis on TWS’ priority landscape in Montana, the Crown of the Continent. Prior to joining The Wilderness Society in 2009, Anne developed and carried out research and conservation projects on large carnivores, ungulates, primates, and elephants throughout Africa and Asia after completing her Ph.D. in Zoology from the University of Wisconsin, Madison in 2000. She is a member of the Working Dogs for Conservation’s Board of Directors, lives in Bozeman, and spends much of her spare time hiking, camping, and skiing throughout Montana with her husband Ron and their two dogs.


Connie Campbell-Pearson

The Rev. Connie Campbell-Pearson

Creation Cries in Eager Longing: Motivating Congregations for Change

The Rev. Connie Campbell-Pearson is an ordained deacon with the Episcopal church. She is working as the facilitator/admin for the Faith, Science and Climate Action Conference. She is newly retired after thirteen years working as the Executive Director for the non-profit, Community Mediation Center in Bozeman. She serves now full time at St. James Episcopal Church in Bozeman and Gethsemane in Manhattan, both in Montana. She has her own LLC that focuses on database consulting and is involved in several major projects in the community, including this FSCA Conference and a Housing First Village Concept for the homeless. Her real involvement in the care of creation began two years ago when she attended a Roundtable for the Crown of the Continent. She had a complete paradigm shift in her understanding about our relationship to the earth and has been working since that time to raise awareness about climate action.


Jody McDevitt

The Rev. Jody McDevitt

A Facilitated Strategy for Action

The Rev. Jody McDevitt is co-pastor of First Presbyterian Church in Bozeman, immediate past president of the Gallatin Valley Interfaith Association (GVIA), and a member of both the Montana Association of Christians(MAC) and Montana Interfaith Network(MIN). Prior to ministry, she was a middle school science teacher whose goal was getting kids outside to appreciate the amazing world in which we live. At the 2015 Parliament of World Religions, she heard a call to integrate her concern for the environment with concern for the poor and less powerful, taking care of the earth for future generations by working with people of all faiths and diverse areas of expertise. Jody is married to the Rev. Dan Krebill, a past president of MAC and the other co-pastor of First Presbyterian Church, and they have two grown daughters and a son-in-law.